thoracolumbar fascia videos

ADHESED FASCIA IS A LIVING BREATHING NIGHTMARE

Diagnostic Ultrasound Fascia Video

Mystic Art Design – Pixabay
Nightmares.  We’ve all had them.  No one likes them, but what are you going to do?  When it comes to things that can go wrong with the body, ADHESED FASCIA can present itself as a nightmare for the simple reason that the most abundant connective tissue in the body also happens to be the most pain-sensitive as well (HERE — some of which is due to the fact that it acts as its own nervous system — HERE).  Add to it the fact that for the most part it can’t be imaged with standard tests such as MRI (HERE), and things can get really crazy really quickly.  Fortunately, thanks to rapid technological advancements in advanced imaging, there is a test that allows visualization of fascia — Diagnostic Ultrasound.  

In the picture below, you’ll notice the diamond-shaped area in the LOW BACK which is called the THORACOLUMBAR FASCIA.  This fascia is impregnated and concurrent with at least three different muscle tendons, giving it three distinct layers that must glide independently of each other.  Although I did a post on this topic several months ago (HERE), I recently added two short (7 second) videos that show how adhesions in the fascia restrict normal joint motion.  For the record, one of the authors of the study the videos came from is DR. HELENE LANGEVIN; one of a growing number of elite physicians touting fascial adhesions as not only the root of huge amounts of pain, but of much — maybe even most — of chronic illness (HERE).

It is amazing to actually see, with my own eyes, the model of pain and dysfunction that I’ve been promoting for two decades actually coming to life like FRANKENSTEIN’S MONSTER.     If nothing else, take a few seconds to watch the videos.  Play them at the same time so you can see the difference side-by-side.  Like I said, amazing!  If you find this interesting, be sure and take a look at my “Fascia Super Post” containing ALL 165 PLUS articles I’ve written on fascia and Scar Tissue.  Oh; and don’t forget to like, share, or follow on FACEBOOK as it’s a great way to reach the people you love and care about most.

Thoracolumbar Fascia

Langevin H, Fox J, Koptiuch C, Badger G, Greenan- Naumann A, Bouffard N, Konofagou E, Lee W, Triano J, Henry S
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